Gwinnett Career and Tech Education program gives students skills beyond the classroom

Hear more from our Executive Director, Jody Reeves, about how the Gwinnett Career & Technical Education program is giving students skills beyond the classroom.

Thank you to the Gwinnett Daily Post for featuring our innovative schools and programs and the unique opportunities that they are providing our students!

 Shiloh high school seniors jennifer lopez and mark everette help a guest during the ribbon cutting ceremony of the cvs mock pharmacy at shiloh high school. the mock pharmacy is part of gwinnett county public schools' effort to secure partnerships with local companies. (File Photo) 

Shiloh high school seniors jennifer lopez and mark everette help a guest during the ribbon cutting ceremony of the cvs mock pharmacy at shiloh high school. the mock pharmacy is part of gwinnett county public schools' effort to secure partnerships with local companies. (File Photo) 

"Traditionally, students attending Gwinnett County Public Schools have had options such as dual enrollment and Advanced Placement classes to help them get ahead in their academic courses. However, there is a third option, one that allows students to get experience in a job field while still getting course credit. That option is choosing one of the pathways in the school district’s Career and Technical Education program.

“We have increased significantly our involvement in CTE programs here in the last four years,” said Jody Reeves, GCPS executive director of academies and career and technical education. “The number of CTE students we serve is more than 70 percent of the counties combined in the state of Georgia. We have a significant student population that takes advantage of CTE.”

Schools such as Shiloh High School have partnered with CVS to form a mock pharmacy, allowing students to get experience as a pharmacy technician and also train to get certification.

“This allows students to earn credentials and certifications that will help them be employed when they graduate,” Reeves said. “We believe that all students need some type of post-secondary education beyond high school.”